Monthly Archives: September 2017

YARA rules for CCleaner 5.33

First reported by Talos and Morphisec, the compromise of CCleaner version 5.33 is still making news.

At NVISO Labs, we created YARA detection rules as soon as the news broke, and distributed these rules to our clients subscribed to our NVISO Security Advisories. In a later blog post, we will explain in detail how to create such YARA rules, so that you can do the same for your organization.

Here are the YARA rules we created:

// YARA rules compromised CCleaner
// NVISO 2017/09/18
// http://blog.talosintelligence.com/2017/09/avast-distributes-malware.html

import "hash"

rule ccleaner_compromised_installer {
	condition:
		filesize == 9791816 and hash.sha256(0, filesize) == "1a4a5123d7b2c534cb3e3168f7032cf9ebf38b9a2a97226d0fdb7933cf6030ff"
}

rule ccleaner_compromised_application {
	condition:
		filesize == 7781592 and hash.sha256(0, filesize) == "36b36ee9515e0a60629d2c722b006b33e543dce1c8c2611053e0651a0bfdb2e9" or
		filesize == 7680216 and hash.sha256(0, filesize) == "6f7840c77f99049d788155c1351e1560b62b8ad18ad0e9adda8218b9f432f0a9"
}

rule ccleaner_compromised_pdb {
	strings:
		$a = "s:\\workspace\\ccleaner\\branches\\v5.33\\bin\\CCleaner\\Release\\CCleaner.pdb" 
		$b = "s:\\workspace\\ccleaner\\branches\\v5.33\\bin\\CCleaner\\ReleaseTV\\CCleaner.pdb" 
	condition:
		uint16(0) == 0x5A4D and uint32(uint32(0x3C)) == 0x00004550 and ($a or $b)
}

You can scan the C: drive of a computer with YARA like this:

yara64.exe -r ccleaner.yara C:\

And there are also many other scanning tools that include the YARA engine, like ClamAV.

Hunting

The first 2 rules we created are hash based, but the third rule (ccleaner_compromised_pdb) is based on a particular string found in CCleaner’s 32-bit executables. This string is the full path of the Program Database (PDB) file, a debug file created by default by Visual Studio and referenced in compiled executables.

With this rule, we were able to identify 235 files on VirusTotal. Most of these are actually container files (like ZIP files): CCleaner is a popular application, and is distributed through various channels other than Piriform’s website. We saw examples of portable application packages distributing this compromised version of CCleaner (like LiberKey) and also RAR files with pirated versions of CCleaner.

23 files were actual executables, and were all compromised versions of the 32-bit executable of CCleaner version 5.33, except one. Most of these files did not have a (valid) signature: they were modified versions, e.g. cracked and infected with other malware.

Only one executable detected by our ccleaner_compromised_pdb rule was not infected: an executable with SHA256 hash c48b9db429e5f0284481b4611bb5b69fb6d5f9ce0d23dcc4e4bf63d97b883fb2. It turns out to be a 32-bit executable of CCleaner version 5.33, digitally signed on 14/09/2017, e.g. after Talos informed Avast/Piriform. The build number was increased with one (6163 instead of 6162). This executable was signed with the same certificate that was used for the compromised version 5.33 (thumbprint f4bda9efa31ef4a8fa3b6bb0be13862d7b8ed9b0), and also for follow-up version 5.34. Yesterday (20/9/2017), Piriform finally released a new version (5.35) signed with a new digital certificate obtained yesterday.

At this moment, we are uncertain about the origins and purpose of this particular executable (c48b9db429e5f0284481b4611bb5b69fb6d5f9ce0d23dcc4e4bf63d97b883fb2).

Are you infected?

Our rules allow you to detect compromised CCleaner executables in your environment, but this does not imply that the machines identified by these rules were infected.

Our analysis shows that the compromised CCleaner installer (version 5.33) will install 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the CCleaner executables on a Windows 64-bit machine, and only the 32-bit version on a Windows 32-bit machine.

The shortcuts (like Start and Desktop shortcuts) deployed during the install on Windows 64-bit machines will point to the 64-bit executable, hence normal usage on a Windows 64-bit machine will execute 64-bit CCleaner.

Only the 32-bit executable of CCleaner is compromised.

It is therefore perfectly possible that compromised 32-bit executables of CCleaner are detected on Windows 64-bit machines with the YARA rules we provided, but that this compromised version was never executed.

If the compromised 32-bit executable runs successfully, it will create the following registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Piriform\Agomo

Two values will be found for this key: MUID and TCID

Conclusion

We recommend that you check for the presence of this registry key, should our YARA rules detect compromised CCleaner installations on your machines.

Compromised machines should be reinstalled after a DFIR investigation.

Active exploitation of Struts vulnerability S2-052 CVE-2017-9805

Yesterday night (06 September 2017 UTC) we observed active exploitation of Struts vulnerability S2-052 CVE-2017-9805 (announced a day earlier).

Here is the request we observed:

The POST request to /struts2-rest-showcase/orders/3 allowed us initially to detect this attempt.

The packet capture shows that this is a full exploit attempt for reconnaissance purposes: the payload is a /bin/sh command to execute a silent wget command to a compromised Russian website (it includes the name of the scanned site as query). The downloaded content is discarded.

The XML data used in this exploit attempt is slightly different from the Metasploit module for CVE-2017-9805: XML element ibuffer is represented as <ibuffer/> in this exploit attempt, while it is represented as <ibuffer></ibuffer> in the proposed Metasploit module. Both forms are functionally equivalent.

We did find an older version of this script that is used in this attack here. This shows how fast attackers attempt to abuse newly discovered vulnerabilities using (potentially unverified) exploits.

The source of this request is the same compromised Russian website, it is the first time we observe exploit attempts for CVE-2017-9805. We saw no other requests from this source since this attempt.

We would recommend everyone to keep an eye out for this type of behavior in their web server logs. As always, we won’t hesitate to share any additional observations we make. Should you observe suspicious behavior and would like to receive additional support, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with our experts!