Malicious PowerPoint Documents Abusing Mouse Over Actions

A new type of malicious MS Office document has appeared: a PowerPoint document that executes a PowerShell command by hovering over a link with the mouse cursor (this attack does not involve VBA macros).

In this blogpost, we will show how to analyze such documents with free, open-source tools.

As usual in attacks involving malicious MS Office document, the document is delivered via email to the victims.
(MD5 DD8CA064682CCCCD133FFE486E0BC77C)

Using emldump.py (a tool to analyze MIME files), we can analyze the email received by the user:

pp-01

The output indicates that the mail attachment is located in part 5. We select part 5, and perform an HEX/ASCII dump of the first 100 bytes to get an idea which type of file we are dealing with:

pp-02

A file starting with PK is most likely a ZIP file. So let’s dump this file and pipe into zipdump.py (a tool to analyze ZIP files):

pp-03

It is indeed a ZIP file. Judging from the filenames in the ZIP file, we can assume it is a PowerPoint file: .pptx or .ppsx.

Using zipdump and option -E (the -E option provides extra information on the type of the contained files), we can get an idea what type of files are contained in this PowerPoint files by looking at the headers and counting how many files have the same header:

pp-04

So the ZIP files (.pptx or .ppsx) contains 1 JPEG file (JFIF), 11 empty files and 36 XML files.

As said at the beginning, malware authors can abuse the mouseover feature of PowerPoint to launch commands. This can be done with an URL using the ppaction:// protocol to launch a PowerShell command.

To identify if this document abuses this feature, we can use YARA. We defined 2 simple YARA rules to search for the strings “ppaction” and “powershell”:

rule ppaction {
strings:
$a = "ppaction" nocase
condition:
$a
}</p>
<p style="text-align: justify;">rule powershell {
strings:
$a = "powershell" nocase
condition:
$a
}

We use zipdump.py to apply the YARA rules on each file contained in the ZIP file:

pp-05

As shown in the screenshot above, file 19 (ppt/slides/slide1.xml, that’s the first slide of the presentation) contains the string ppaction string, file 21 (ppt/slides/_rels/slide1.xml.rels) contains the string powershell.

Let’s take a look at file 19:

pp-06

We can see that it contains a a:linkMouseOver element with an action to launch a program (ppaction://program). So this document will launch a program when the user hovers with his mouse over a link. Clicking is not required, as is explained here.

The program to be executed can be found with id rId2, but we already suspect that the program is Powershell and is defined in file 21. So let’s take a look:

pp-07

Indeed, as shown in the screenshot above, we have a Target=”powershell… command with Id=”rId2″. Let’s extract and decode this command. First we use re-search.py to extract Target values with a regular expression:

pp-08

This gives us the URL-encoded PowerShell command (and a second Target value, a name for an .xml file, which is not important for this analysis). With translate.py and a bit of Python code, we can use module urllib to decode the URL:

pp-09

Now we can clearly recognize the PowerShell command: it will download and execute a file. The URL is not completely clear yet. It is constructed by concatenating (+) strings and bytes cast to characters ([char] 0x2F) in PowerShell. Byte 0x2F is the ASCII value of the forward slash (/), so let’s use sed to replace this byte cast by the actual character:

pp-10

And we can now “perform the string concatenation” by removing ‘+’ using sed again:

pp-11

We can now clearly see from which URL the file is downloaded, that it is written in the temporary folder with .jse extension and then executed.

To extract the URL, we can use re-search.py again:

pp-12

A .jse file is an encoded JavaScript file. It’s the same encoding as for VBE (encoded VBScript), and can be decoded using this tool.

Conclusion

It’s rather easy to detect potentially malicious PowerPoint files that abuse this feature by looking for string ppaction (this string can be obfuscated). The string powershell is also a good candidate to search for, but note that other programs than PowerShell can be used to perform a malicious action.

Update

We produced a video demonstrating a proof-of-concept PowerPoint document that abuses mouse over actions (we will not release this PoC). This video shows the alerts produced by Microsoft PowerPoint, and also illustrates what happens with documents with a mark-of-web (documents downloaded from the Internet or saved from email attachments).

Sources:
“Zusy” PowerPoint Malware Spreads Without Needing Macros: https://sentinelone.com/blogs/zusy-powerpoint-malware-spreads-without-needing-macros/
Tools used: https://blog.didierstevens.com/didier-stevens-suite/
a:hlinkMouseOver: http://www.datypic.com/sc/ooxml/e-a_hlinkMouseOver-1.html
shp-hyperlink: http://python-pptx.readthedocs.io/en/latest/dev/analysis/shp-hyperlink.html
Sed: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sed

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