Analysis of a CVE-2017-0199 Malicious RTF Document

There is a new exploit (CVE-2017-0199) going around for which a patch was released by Microsoft on 11/04/2017. In this post, we analyze an RTF document exploiting this vulnerability and provide a YARA rule for detection.

rtfdump.py is a Python tool to analyze RTF documents. Running it on our sample produces a list with all “entities” in the RTF document (text enclosed between {}):

This is often a huge list with a lot of information. But here, we are interested in OLE 1.0 objects embedded within this RTF file. We can use the filter with option -f O for such objects:

There are 2 entities (objdata and datastore) with indices 153 and 249 (this is a number generated by rtfdump, it is not part of the RTF code). The content of an object is encoded with hexadecimal characters in an RTF file,  entity 153 contains 5448 hexademical characters. So let’s take a look by selecting this entity for deeper analysis with option -s 153:

In this hex/ascii dump, we can see that the text starts with 01050000 02000000, indicating an OLE 1.0 object. As the second line starts with d0cf11e0, we can guess it contains an OLE file.

With option -H, we can convert the hexadecimal characters to binary:

Now we can see the string OLE2Link, which has often been referred to when talking about this zero-day. With option -i, we can get more information about the embedded object:

So it is clearly an embedded OLE file, and the name OLE2Link followed by a zero byte was chosen to identify this embedded OLE file. With option -E, we can extract the embedded object:

Since this is an OLE file, we can analyze it with oledump.py: we dump the file with option -d and pipe it into oledump:

The OLE file contains 2 streams. Let’s take a look at the first stream:

We can recognize a URL, let’s extract it with strings:

Because of vulnerability CVE-2017-0199, this URL will automatically be downloaded. The web server serving this document, will identify it as an HTA file via a Content-Type header:

Because this download is performed by the URL Moniker, this moniker will recognize the content-type and open the downloaded file with Microsoft’s HTA engine. The downloaded HTA file might look to us like an RTF file, but the HTA parser will find the VBS script and execute it:

This VBS script performs several actions, ultimately downloading and executing a malicious executable.

Detection

Let’s take a second look at the first stream in the OLE file (the stream with the malicious URL):

The byte sequence that we selected here (E0 C9 EA 79 F9 BA CE 11 8C 82 00 AA 00 4B A9 0B), is the binary representation of the URL Moniker GUID: {79EAC9E0-BAF9-11CE-8C82-00AA004BA90B}. Notice that the binary byte sequence and the text representation of the GUID is partially reversed, this is typical for GUIDs.

After the URL Moniker GUID, there is a length field, followed by the malicious URL (and then followed by a file closing sequence, …).

We use the following YARA rule to hunt for these RTF documents:

rule rtf_objdata_urlmoniker_http {
 strings:
 $header = "{\\rtf1"
 $objdata = "objdata 0105000002000000" nocase
 $urlmoniker = "E0C9EA79F9BACE118C8200AA004BA90B" nocase
 $http = "68007400740070003a002f002f00" nocase
 condition:
 $header at 0 and $objdata and $urlmoniker and $http
 }
 

Remark 1: we do not search for string OLE2Link

Remark 2: with a bit of knowledge of the RTF language, it is trivial to modify documents to bypass detection by this rule

Remark 3: the search for http:// (string $http) is case sensitive, and if you want, you can omit it (for example, it will not trigger on https).

Remark 4: there is no test for the order in which these strings appear

Happy hunting!

3 thoughts on “Analysis of a CVE-2017-0199 Malicious RTF Document

  1. Pingback: 【知识】4月13日 - 每日安全知识热点 - 莹莹之色

  2. Pingback: CVE-2017-0199 | Didier Stevens

  3. Pingback: Week 16 – 2017 – This Week In 4n6

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