A practical guide to RFID badge copying

During red teaming assignments we are sporadically asked to attempt to gain access to certain physical “flags”. These flags could be the inside of a server room, or the workstation of a member of the management team.

Aside from these red teaming assignments, in most organisations, access badges are often the single factor of security that stands between us and the inside of a building, a server room or an office. There are many different RFID card reading systems on the market. Unfortunately, the security they provide is often lacking. With this blog post we want to demonstrate how easy it is to bypass the card reader security mechanism when it is insufficiently secured.

Specialised hardware is required to clone existing RFID cards, this hardware can easily be obtained and is relatively inexpensive. For this case study, we use the Proxmark3, which is a device developed by Jonathan Westhues that allows sniffing, reading and cloning of RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) tags.

DISCLAIMER: This blog post, and by extent any other blog post written by NVISO LABS, are intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended and should not be used for the illegitimate cloning of RFID badges without prior permission.

proxmark3_pic1

Cloning and abusing the card

Below we’ll provide a step by step example on how to clone an HID global RFID card. Note that the Proxmark3 is able to copy many different types of cards.

We have two types of antennas that we can connect to our Proxmark3: a low frequency one and a high frequency one. The low frequency card, operating at 125kHz and 134kHz, can communicate with e.g. HID Prox II, HITAG, and EM4100 tags. The high frequency card, operating at 13.56Mhz, can communicate with e.g. Mifare Classic/Ultralight and iClass tags.

After starting up the proxmark3 interface, we can run the“hw tune”command to see if any card is detected. Currently the LF antenna is connected to the Proxmark3 and at this point there is no card in the presence of our LF antenna.

proxmark3_pic4

When repeating the “hw tune” command, this time with the card within reach of our antenna, we see a clear difference in voltage in comparison with the previous screenshot. This indicates we are dealing with a low frequency card.

proxmark3_pic5

Our next step is finding the type of card we have. Using the “lf search” command we can scan the card. Before executing this command, make sure the card is already on the antenna. If not, the search command will return errors.

proxmark3_pic6

The proxmark3 confirms we are working with a HID global RFID card and we discover its ID: 07848XXXX (redacted). Now we need to use the according command to clone the card.

Using the Proxmark3 help function for the HID cards, we see we can use the clone function.

proxmark3_pic7

The T55x7 you see in the output above, is a type of card that is extremely versatile and supports multiple encoding formats of the majority of 125 Khz RFID tag transponders. We can thus use this type of card to emulate our HID card.

proxmark3_pic8

After executing the command above, including the HID Prox TAG ID identified in the previous steps, we have successfully cloned our card.

That’s all it takes!  Check the video below for proof.

On a final note, when your office building is protected by such an insecure card reading system, often the only solution to fix this vulnerability is to replace the card reading infrastructure and all access badges. Needless to say this will have a significant impact on your organisation.

The following recommendations can be made to improve the security:

  • Use of encryption to ensure that the ID is not sent in clear text. Think of challenge response authentication;
  • Use of contactless smart cards which have encryption, mutual authentication and message replay protection incorporated.

Additionally, it is known that attackers try to covertly copy your RFID cards, for example during a trip on the metro. You can try using an RFID protected sleeve/wallet, but research has shown that not all of them are effective at preventing covert copying. Be sure to test yours out and share your findings!

2 thoughts on “A practical guide to RFID badge copying

  1. Wagner Bertolini Junior

    That’s why we use Mifare’s with data encrypted inside. Then, you need a key to (authenticate and) read data. But you are right, at almost all physical access security systems this basic logic (unique id) its used to give access to someone.

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  2. Pingback: IT Security Weekend Catch Up – January 13, 2017 – BadCyber

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