Analyzing an Office Maldoc with a VBA Emulator

Today we were informed of another maldoc sample. After a quick look, we were convinced that this sample would be a good candidate for Philippe Lagadec’s VBA emulator ViperMonkey.

The maldoc in a nutshell: when the spreadsheet is opened, the VBA code builds a long JScript script and then executes it. This script contains base64 code for an executable (ransomware Petya GoldenEye version), which is written to disk and executed. The building of the script is done with heavily obfuscated VBA code, so we thought it would be a good idea to try ViperMonkey. ViperMonkey is a free, open-source VBA emulator engine written in Python. You can use it to emulate VBA code on different platforms without MS Office.

Taking a look with oledump.py at this sample (md5 b231884cf0e4f33d84912e7a452d3a10), we see it contains a large VBA macro stream:

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Here is the end of the VBA code:

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Let’s analyze this with ViperMonkey:

vmonkey.py sample.vir

Since there are a lot of VBA statements, it will take ViperMonkey some time (couple of minutes) to parse this:

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In the end we get this result:

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ViperMonkey doesn’t identify any suspicious actions, but we see that the ActiveX object to be created is “MSScriptControl.ScriptControl”. This string was obfuscated with Chr concatenations, and ViperMonkey was able to parse it. To parse all obfuscated expressions like this, we provide option -e to ViperMonkey:

vmonkey.py -e sample.vir

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We this information, we can understand what subroutine Workbook_Open does: it executes a JScript script stored in variable LQ3.

How to we get the value of LQ3? We can set ViperMonkey’s log level to debug, and log the emulation of all statements. This will produce a lot of output, so it’s beter to redirect this to file.

vmonkey.py -l debug sample.vir > output.log 2> debug.log

Searching for the last occurrence of string “setting LQ3” in debug.log, we find the JScript script:

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This script decodes a BASE64 payload, writes it to disk and then executes it: it’s a new variant of Petya ransomware, GoldenEye.

 

3 thoughts on “Analyzing an Office Maldoc with a VBA Emulator

  1. Pingback: Week 49 – 2016 – This Week In 4n6

  2. Pingback: Videos: Analyzing an Office Maldoc with a VBA Emulator | NVISO LABS – blog

  3. Pingback: Overview of Content Published In December | Didier Stevens

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